Saturday, 2 February 2013

Enabling Technologies

Enabling Technologies Biography

The Board of Education appointed Dr. A.C. McKay as principal in June, 1911. Most of the solid foundation of technical education in Toronto can be justly ascribed to the work of this man; indeed, had subsequent Boards adhered to his original plans, the system would have been even better. A former professor of physics at U. of T., a chancellor of McMaster, and an experienced teacher in both elementary and secondary schools, Dr. McKay was a man with a great vision of technical education. Dr. McKay began his plans for Central Tech by first visiting the great polytechnical schools of Europe. He returned with very definite ideas about the kind of building he wanted and immediately announced a competition open to all architects. The competition was won by Ross and Macfarlane of Montreal. The cornerstone of the new building was laid on September 3, 1913, by Robert Borden, Prime Minister of Canada.
This building, with several expansions, remains the school’s home to this day. Features originally incorporated in the building include the crest over the main entrance of the school, the coat of arms of the City of Toronto. Central Tech is the only school that has the privilege of using this crest; it is due to the fact that the citizens of Toronto paid for the school without the aid of other levels of government.
The “ribbon” across the bottom of the crest carries the legend “Industry, Intelligence, and Integrity”. These qualities have always characterized our top graduates. The two capitals that top the columns supporting the main entrance arch presented a bit of a problem. The Scottish stonemasons who build the school wanted to make their own contribution to the building and they felt that the standard Gothic caps would lack interest. As their gift, they carved the two gnomes that surmount the columns. The one is dressed in academic cap and gown and is busy writing in a book, thus representing the academic side of the school. The second gnome is in the ancient garb of a journeyman working with hammer and chisel, representing the technical side of the school.
The Exhibition Room, 208, with its fine paneling and fireplace, was a gift from the builder at no cost to the citizens. The principal’ s office occupied the whole of Room 202 It was beautifully paneled in dark red mahogany with a beamed ceiling and plaster medallions that were masterpieces of the plasterer’s art.
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies
Enabling Technologies

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